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Review: Dino Crisis 2

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Dino_Crisis_2Console: Playstation, Windows
Released: 2000
Developer: Capcom
Publisher: Capcom
Digital Release? Yes, PSN version compatible with PS3, PSP, and Vita for $5.99
Price: $14.00 (disc only), $25.00 (complete), $50.00 (sealed) per Price Charting

Dino Crisis 2: The Lost World. Okay, it’s just Dino Crisis 2.  Just a year after the first game, we get the second game from Capcom, and this time the developers decided to stray away from the survival horror gameplay and try take the series into a unique direction.  This is where the series started to experiment and take a new direction in terms of gameplay and mechanics. So was the game a development success or should it be a forgotten fossil?

dc2_1Dino Crisis 2 has a rather complex plot from its predecessor.  A city has vanished in time which was working with “third energy” and the survivors are now having to put up with some rather hungry Dinosaur residents.  Regina from the first game and a team called TRAT (another great Capcom name) are sent through a time portal to rescue survivors.  Surprisingly you begin the game as Dylan a generic looking army guy from TRAT. Throughout the game you will swap between Dylan and Regina who both use their own unique weapons.   The plot is explained at the end of the game in a very long cutscene but it’s unlikely you will particularly care, the story really comes across as an after thought in this game.

On your very first dinosaur encounter you realise the focus of the game has shifted to action over survival horror.  Initial impressions of the game are positive, plus you now have a Hud which displays your health status and your ammo. You can also move not only with your weapon readied and while you shoot as well as having tons of ammo to cope with the ridiculous amount of enemies you’ll be blasting. In fact, its fair to say you see more raptors in the first segment of Dino Crisis 2 than in the entire campaign of the original game.

When you enter an area dinosaurs will spawn constantly and as opposed to running away you’re now encouraged to shoot everything. It can feel frustrating as the dinosaurs sometimes leap out of bushes and damage you, which feels cheap and unfair. You rack up “extinction points” and can even increase these points by getting combo kills and exiting an area without receiving any damage. Extinction points can be used at computer terminals which are scattered throughout the game. You can buy new weapons, ammo, upgrade the ammo capacity of a gun, buy health items and upgrade items for your character. You can also save at the terminals as well.

Controls are practically identical to the original game. The main differences are you can press L1 to aim at a different target thought I found this useless in the game and just didn’t seem to work. It was easier just to re press R1 and you would aim at the nearest target. As opposed to a primary weapon you now used a secondary weapon like a machete to attack enemies in close quarters. This was very useful especially when being attacked by multiple enemies. The game also mixes gameplay up with a few on rails turret sections which mix the action up and are a nice change of pace.

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Puzzles this time around are essentially find a key and put it in the right door or buy a item from the computer terminal to progress through a section of the level. Though none are taxing on the mind some of the keys are hidden in horrible places that require you to backtrack through the game quite far to find them. The good news is I found on multiple play throughs you could pick these items up early if you know where to look.

The graphics return to pre rendered backgrounds in this game, so all screens are static and no more 3D models in the level environments. This probably was for the best as the game looks great. The environments are now a lot more varied, you’ll be running through jungles to larva filled caves. There is even one section where you will put on a diving suit and explore underwater which was very interesting. Of course occasionally you will hit a research facility to investigate but with the pre rendered backgrounds they look so much nicer this time around. The character models are as to be expected by this stage. The dinosaurs look fantastic especially with the variety of beasts you will encounter this time around.

Since the game is less about horror and more about shooting dinos in the face the game includes a full soundtrack. The music is surprisingly catchy and suited to the environment your exploring. Yes, the terrible voice acting returns with some really brilliant Capcom one liners this time around. The dinosaur sound effects are absolutely superb.

dc2_3It’s very much worth pointing out both Dino Crisis 1 and 2 introduced mechanics that would become standard affair in later Capcom titles. Dino Crisis brought 3D environments, 180 turns and the dreaded quick time even. Dino Crisis 2 brought a point system which could be used to buy and upgrade weapons. As gamers we have a lot to thanks (and in some cases hate) the series for.

Dino Crisis 2 is not a very long game. You will probably finish the first time through in around six hours and this will significantly decrease with multiple playthroughs. The game is not particularly difficult but crank it up to the hardest setting and it will keep you busy for a while. There are no multiple endings but you unlock the Dino Colosseum this is a mini game which allows you to play as characters and even dinosaurs from the series in a mini game where you have to wipe out multiple waves of dinosaurs. You can also unlock a VS mode where you and a friend can choose a dinosaur and fight to the death. There is also Dino Files to collect through the main campaign finding all of these unlocks a special card which lets you play through the game with unlimited ammo.

Dino Crisis 2 is a fantastic sequel taking the series in a direction that is different but better. The game builds on practically everything from the original. More dinosaur types from 5 to 11 so your not just shooting raptors for a change. More weapons for each character. More varied environments and just generally more fun. What the game does focus less on is puzzles. Funnily enough the audience who may dislike this game are the hardcore survival horror fans, which is funny as that’s the audience I recommend the first game to. The game is entertaining and very simple to pick up and play. Even after your done it is likely you’ll occasionally re visit the game to casually playthrough again.

Final Score: 4 out of 5  (Review Policy)

Also be sure to check out the Gaming History 101 Podcast Game Club episode where we discuss both Dino Crisis 1 and 2.

Written by jamalais

August 13, 2014 at 3:26 pm

Review: Dino Crisis

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dc_boxConsole: Playstation, Dreamcast, PC
Released: 1999
Developer: Capcom
Publisher: Capcom
Digital Release? Yes, PSN version compatible with PS3, PSP, and Vita for $5.99
Price: $7.50 (disc only), $10.00 (complete), $35.00 (sealed) per Price Charting

Dino Crisis really sounds like a winning formula if, like me, you are are fan of survival horror and dinosaurs. What could possibly go wrong? Well its time to revisit this Sony Playstation 1999 release and see if it stood the test of time or should have remained extinct.

Dino Crisis released when survival horror was hitting a peak in the industry, at least in terms of the “tank-like” control system. The Sony Playstation had plenty of games like it to offer. In the same year Dino Crisis released we also saw Silent Hill from Konami and Resident Evil 3: Nemesis also from Capcom. Interesting to note: Shinji Mikami – creator of the original Resident Evil – was heavily involved in the production of this game so much so his name was put on the front of the box in hopes it would sell the game. Clearly something worked as Dino Crisis managed to sell over one million copies.

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Dino Crisis is set on Lisle Island and you play Regina, a member of SORT (Special Operations Rescue Team), because it wouldn’t be a Capcom game without a made up special unit. Regina, along with your team members Gail and Rick, are sent into the facility to hunt down Dr. Kirk who is a scientist working on a project titled ‘Third Energy”, which is believed to be linked to the production of dangerous weapons. Not long into the mission you find out most people in the facility are dead and the place seems rather empty, which should probably sound familiar for a survival horror game. Rather than the place being infested with a different common nasty, you find it’s dinosaurs that are responsible. So begins a survival tale of finding Dr. Kirk and getting out without becoming dino food. There really is not much to say on the story and it follows a very predictable path, even if you haven’t played other Capcom survival horror games.  Still, if you hunger a more in-depth look at the complete plot, we did a game club on it that you’re welcome to listen to.

Dino Crisis is a survival horror game that uses the tank style controls that are really “love it or hate it” by this point. You have limited ammo and health items and are generally expected to run from enemies more than attack them. Dino Crisis does introduce some new mechanics to the mix as well. In this game you can ready your weapon and move at the same time, however when you shoot your weapon you still remain stationary. You can spin 180 degrees on the spot, which is handy for quick escapes in the game. There is also this unique mixing mechanic where you can combine ammo and health items to create special items to enhance your equipment. Another new health item allows you to continue from the room you left off, should you die, basically acting as extra lives without returning to the last room you saved in. This mechanic comes in very handy for some of the frustrating encounters.  This game will, at times, allow you to make decisions on how the story progresses, triggered by the characters Rick and Gail giving you a choice on how to handle a particular situation. It’s a interesting mechanic that encourages more than one playthrough of the game and also helps you see the entire story – if you have any interest, that is.

dc_postA mechanic I didn’t care for in this game was the damage indication. There is no health bar, not even in your item menu. You are expected to watch Regina’s stature and movement to tell if she is injured. This sounds unique on paper, but most dinosaurs take a lot of health off especially on harder difficulties, making you more likely over use health items and get pretty irritated. Regina can also bleed, indicated by a small blood trail as you walk. Basically she will bleed out and die unless you stop the bleeding with a hemostat or health item that combines that effect. Surprisingly, these health items were pretty sparse.

The game feels much more puzzle-focused than action. You will regularly encounter puzzles which require you to find two discs and then enter a password by solving a logic puzzle. These are repeated throughout the game and get progressively harder. Though it is nice to see a game that asks you to use your head for a change, the backtracking through the environments to look for a single item gets very frustrating.

The graphics of the game are something new for the genre. The entire level design is now 3D rendered – this means all the items and environments are given their own 3D model – which is counter to what we’ve seen in the Resident Evil series that used pre-rendered backgrounds with single character models. Also occasionally the camera will follow Regina as she moves. It was probably a test what to expect from Resident Evil: Code Veronica, which used the trick often. Though the engine looks cool if you have a appreciation for game engines, to most gamers it will come across as ugly because the environments lack depth and detail when compared to pre-rendered environments used by most other survival horror games.  This is to be expected due to the technical limitations of the time – early 3D provided you with flexibility or graphical quality, but almost never both.

Character models are standard affair, the dinosaurs really steal the show as they look very impressive especially considering this is an original Playstation game. It’s just a shame there is not more dinosaur types. You have the raptor, which is the main enemy you will face, pterodactyl which are just a pain, Compy which just chase you around, some four legged dino that does a hefty amount of damage. Then there is the T–rex, which just looks great and most encounters with it lead to one hit deaths unless you handle them properly.

dc_3There is not much music in the game just the occasional tension theme to add to the horror elements. The voice acting is absolutely awful, but why would you want it any other way for a Capcom game?  The most memorable sounds are by far the dinosaur noises from the T-rex and raptor. Sometimes you’ll walk down a corridor and hear a raptor but it will never appear, a rare moment where the game actually felt scary.

To the games credit it really does try to make a game using Dinosaurs scary. The game introduces these “danger” segments where you walk down a corridor and a dinosaur essentially jumps you and the screen flashes “danger” you have to rapidly press any button on the controller to escape. It sounds like a good idea but like Quick Time Events (QTEs) in general these segments surprise you so suddenly if you don’t mash the buttons quick enough you die instantly.

I is not the longest game. Your first playthrough may take up to eight hours but that will significantly drop once you know where you are going. The game has multiple endings, harder difficulties and some extra modes unlocked once you have finished.  Overall, Dino Crisis is a decent game that will absolutely appeal to fans of survival horror and gamers that have a appreciation for early game design choices like the 3D models. For everyone else it’s a hard sell even if you like dinosaurs because the game generally is not that memorable and doesn’t bring anything new to the table. I may have rated the game low but that’s only because I feel this won’t appeal to the mass market of gamers. Those that appreciate this game for what it brought to survival horror will be happy to add it to their collection.

Final Score: 2 out of 5  (our review policy and scoring can be found here)

 

Written by jamalais

August 10, 2014 at 3:00 pm

Podcast: Silent Evil 2: Resident Hill

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This week we are tackling quite possibly the two most popular titles of survival horror: Resident Evil 2 and Silent Hill 2.  Resident Evil 2 was scrapped only a few months before completion and completely redone, resulting in many of the staples that carried the franchise forward and stands as a fan favorite.  Meanwhile Silent Hill 2 waited until the Playstation 2 hit the market and with one of the creepiest atmospheres of all times redefined what horror gaming could be.  We openly discuss the notable aspects of both.


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Written by spydersvenom

July 16, 2014 at 11:00 am

Podcast: Dino Crisis 1 & 2 Game Club

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This week we are talking about Capcom’s survival horror titles in a dinosaur-infested facility, Dino Crisis and Dino Crisis 2.  A testing ground for new survival horror mechanics, it’s interesting to see the decisions made in what is one of the more interesting two titles of the original Playstation’s late titles.


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Written by spydersvenom

July 2, 2014 at 11:00 am

Video: Retro Game Night with Dino Crisis 2 and Dead Rising 3 DLC

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This week for Retro Game Night we are playing Dino Crisis 2 to wrap up the game club for June and trying out the fan service that is Super Ultra Dead Rising 3 Arcade Remix Edition Ex Plus Alpha (Dash).  Click on the pics below to be taken to the videos (we do not embed videos to improve site load times).

Podcast: Data Easy Meets West

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No it’s not a typo (just an inside joke), but we are actually talking about Data East and Data West.  This includes the games they developed, published, and even the pinball titles available.  It may not seem it, but Data East was a limited and significant developer of the mid-late 80s and just about all of the 90s.

Special thanks to Retronauts Episode 88 (1up Run), Brandon Sheffield (and his blog/podcast Insert Credit), as well as Topless Robot for your Data East and extensive Data West information.

Also be sure to check out the ASCII RPG/roguelike Sanctuary, for free, at the following address: http://blackshellgames.itch.io/srpg


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Written by spydersvenom

June 25, 2014 at 12:50 pm

Video: Retro Game Night – Dino Crisis

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dc_coverOne of this week’s Retro Game Night titles kicks off the June game club with 1999’s Dino Crisis.  Click on the box art above to view the video.  From Resident Evil creator Shinji Mikami, this game was simply put as Resident Evil meets Jurassic Park, even at the admission of the game’s characters.  In this video we play the first hour with commentary and get you set up for an interesting take on the survival horror genre.  We are doing both the first and second game for June, so watch for the sequel coming in two weeks.

Written by spydersvenom

June 8, 2014 at 2:43 pm

Podcast: Castleroid?

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metroidvania

This week we tackle the “MetroidVania” titles in the Castlevania franchise to follow up our initial episode (Devil’s Castle Dracula).  Fred and Jam briefly define MetroidVania as a genre, discuss some titles that originated it, and discuss Symphony of the Night – the most prolific of the series – as well as the multiple portable titles that followed.


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Podcast: Final Fantasy in 3D

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This week we are joined by listener Fortengard and Andy from 42 Level One to discuss the original Playstation Final Fantasy games (FF VII – FF IX).  Controversy erupts over the endless love and condemnation for VII, the brutal Junction System of VIII, and the all-too-familiar nature of IX.  All beloved, the final opinion is that they should all be experienced.


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Written by spydersvenom

April 30, 2014 at 11:21 am

Posted in Playstation, podcast

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Retro Game Night: Einhander

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einhander

This week for #RetroFridays we are playing the PS1 shmup Einhander from Squaresoft.  Released in 1997 this was an oddity because Square was better known for a slew of great RPGs, including Final Fantasy VII.  This was captured on actual hardware playing an actual disc, no emulation.  Click here or on the box art (I prefer this Japanese box art over the poor American one) to be taken to the video.

Written by spydersvenom

April 19, 2014 at 11:32 am

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