Gaming History 101

Know Your Roots

Podcast: Are You One of Us?

with 2 comments

tg16_post

This week Fred flies solo to discuss the short live but highly coveted niche console the Turbografx-16.  With an 8-bit processor and a 16-bit graphics card this Japan-centric console by NEC only hung around for 4-5 years but has a cult following almost as intense as Sega.  This episode covers its release, different versions, Japanese counterpart the PC Engine, and of course the expensive CD expansion and games.


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Written by Fred Rojas

August 21, 2013 at 11:00 am

2 Responses

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  1. Great look back at the TG-16. Was one of my favorite consoles growing up. Made the same move as you (bought at Toys-R-Us for 50 and games for 5) and still consider it my best purchase to date. Only complaint about the system was the short controller cord. The single port never bothered me since most games I had were single player.

    albirhiza

    September 13, 2013 at 9:28 am

  2. Wow the Turbografix looks like a Master System (1) with the cartridge slot removed and a butchered card slot… I much prefer the look of the original PC Engine myself.

    There were actually six games released on the SuperGrafx, you missed Darius Plus which was a dual format card, much like the early Gameboy Color carts that also worked in original Gameboys, this card detected whether it was inserted in a PC Engine or SuperGrafx and ran the according version.

    Sparky Kestrel

    September 20, 2018 at 9:35 pm


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