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Posts Tagged ‘night trap

Interview: Screaming Villains Talks Night Trap 25th Anniversary Edition

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It wasn’t an hour after the announcement trailer hit online that I knew I had to talk to people behind Night Trap 25th Anniversary Edition.  Tyler, owner of Screaming Villains (the developer behind this project), was kind enough to sit down and chat with me about the upcoming release.


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Written by Fred Rojas

April 26, 2017 at 10:00 am

The 2017 GH101 Fundraiser 24 Hour Livestream is Archived and Live

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Below is the entire playlist of videos from the livestream, but it would probably be better if you use YouTube for this one. The playlist can be found here. On multi-game streams (there were a few) you can find clickable links to specific starting points for titles.

It’s a self-playing list containing the 21 videos captured during the livestream. Two of the videos: “Fred plays Rock Band 3 with his brother and wife” and “Metroid 2 vs. AM2R” need some edits due to muting thanks to copyright claims, but are totally worth seeing and will be live in the next day or so. They will automatically be added to the playlist.

We are fully funded for 2017 and it’s thanks to all of you! It was a blast and we look forward to doing it again next year. Thanks for all who came out and all that check these videos out. If you would like to make a donation, it’s still not too late! We have a Patreon running with plenty of worthwhile stretch goals here and single donations are always available at bit.ly/gh101donate.

Documentary: Dangerous Games (Night Trap)

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Over the years Fred has collected a lot of limited editions, bonus discs, promo videos, and randomly e-mailed/mailed documentaries and making of videos involving video games.  Well it seems pointless to keep them to himself and since we don’t generate ad revenue we’re betting YouTube may let us release these promotional items.  In a new ongoing series, we will be releasing the many videos made available that you probably won’t be able to get your hands on due to rarity or the disposable promo value of them.  We start today with a pseudo “making of” and “post mortem” on the controversial game Night Trap.  It’s about 8 minutes of Tom Zito, Rob Fulop, and James Riley basically pleading with us about the fun and light heartedness of this game that was targeted by the US Senate.  As a fan of Night Trap, it’s a brief and all smiles look at a game that was touted as much more nefarious than it ever could hope to be.

Written by Fred Rojas

May 7, 2015 at 3:00 pm

Opinion: Don’t Try to Re-write History With Your Fanboyism

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battletoads

Guys, lets face it, nostalgia is a bitch.  I even wrote an article about this in the past, but beyond my casual forewarning, I would like to extend a realistic look at what is going on today in gaming.  Some big fans are trying to re-write history with how much they love games that, in hindsight, weren’t all that good.  You’ll notice that I said “how much they love games” and “in hindsight”, which I would like to break down.  People who are massive unapologetic fans of fair-to-poor quality games should not be told they are wrong because they aren’t.  Your opinion is your own and without even a discussion you have a right to it, not to mention those that can properly make an argument for why they love a game, but realize your opinion is shrouded in nostalgia or just a lack of basic sense.

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Written by Fred Rojas

May 5, 2015 at 11:43 am

Review: Double Switch (Sega CD)

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Console: Sega-CD/Mega-CD
Released: 1993
Developer: Digital Pictures
Publisher: Sega
Instruction Manual: Not Necessary – Link
Difficulty: Hard
Played it as a child? Yes
Value: $2.63 (used), $7.63 (new) (pricecharting.com
Other Releases: Yes – Sega Saturn, PC/MAC
Digital Release? No

This is the game that brought it all together and proved that not only was a full motion video (FMV) game possible, it could be properly acted with high production values.  Unfortunately, I’m pretty sure this title completely bombed on the Sega CD, otherwise there wouldn’t be so many freaking copies in the world (both used and sealed).  Despite its commonality, Double Switch is like many other titles in the vast gaming world that starts off solid and becomes a veritable train wreck near the end.  Honestly that’s when its commonality and subsequent low price tag come in to justify the purchase because I still really dig this title.  It’s definitely not without plenty of flaws and if played in long intervals, can easily induce the need to never touch it again.  If you can stomach it, this title does bring with it all the charm of a far-fetched early 90s pop film, which lead Corey Haim should suggest by the very fact he’s cast in the game.  With the proper introduction, Double Switch was a fair follow-up to its much more popular, although purely due to its controversy, older brother Night Trap.

Developer Digital Pictures is solely to blame for the FMV game and it held the most firm grasp and largest library on the Sega CD.  A company that started off as the lead developer for Hasbro’s canceled NEMO game system (that would do basically the same thing with VHS tapes), most of the sales celebrated by the company came from all the controversy of Night Trap.  Even back then there was clear admission that Night Trap was a dated title that lacked almost any interactivity by the player and had terrible acting to boot.  Double Switch, the successor that would follow the same structure without being a true sequel, hoped to address many of these complaints and did a fairly decent job of it.  Unfortunately no one factored in the fact that many gamers thought they would see graphic violence or sexual themes as the sole reason for picking up Night Trap, the return on investment was hardly there.  With what was surely a much higher budget than any similar title at the time, Double Switch was a big gamble that failed and not without good reason.

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Written by Fred Rojas

November 26, 2012 at 3:13 pm

Great Retro Halloween Games That Aren’t Scary

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Happy Halloween to all of our lovely retro readers.  All month we’ve been chatting about horror gaming, ominous dark rooms, and I’ve been spending one moment in Silent Hill and the next running from the Slenderman.  I thought it might be fun to finally offer some retro Halloween gaming for the timid, nervous, screaming little scaredy cats out there.  Yep, you read that correctly, here’s a list of fun Halloween videos games that aren’t intended to scare you.

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Written by Fred Rojas

October 31, 2012 at 2:12 pm

Guilty Pleasure: Night Trap (Sega CD/32X CD/3DO/PC)

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Console: Sega-CD/Mega-CD, 32X CD, 3DO, PC
Released: 1992
Developer: Digital Pictures
Publisher: Sega (Sega/Mega-CD, 32X CD), Virgin (3DO), Digital Pictures (PC)
Instruction Manual: Not necessary – Link
Difficulty: Easy
Played it as a child? Yes
Value: $25.00-$50.00 (used) $50.00 (new) (pricecharting.com) – Prices for various platforms
Price: $25-$50 (used) N/A (new) on eBay
Digital Release? No

Oh Night Trap, your reputation precedes you.  In actuality this game has received far too much press than it’s probably worth and constitutes an odd sense of rarity about the title.  It’s too bad because had this title fallen into the $5-$10 category that its brethren Sewer Shark, Corpse Killer, and Double Switch dwell, more people would probably appreciate the title.  Unfortunately due to some senate hearings and the fact that this game was alongside Mortal Kombat and Lethal Enforcers for why the ESRB ratings needed to exist in the first place, people think they are going to see some explicit content.  That, friends, is simply not true.  Putting all that publicity aside, there is a meaty cult-style game here that perhaps suffers less than other full motion video (FMV) games.  It’s not great, but it sure is fun to watch at least once.

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Written by Fred Rojas

October 8, 2012 at 12:39 pm

Supplement: Video Game Violence Heats Up

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I remember going to the roller skating rink on Thursday nights and even though I was an avid gamer, puberty had started to kick in and girls were much more interesting to me.  That is, until Mortal Kombat.  I had already seen and gotten my butt kicked by most of the Street Fighter II players, but that game was too cartoon-like and I didn’t much care for it.  Mortal Kombat was different.  It had digitized actors playing as each of the fighters, heavy blows to the face would result in large globs of blood spraying across the floor and I’ll never forget the first time someone won a round with Johnny Cage and the words “Finish Him!” flashed on-screen.  The player walked up to his opponent and did what looked like a complex combination of buttons, the screen darkened, and Johnny Cage straight up punched the guys freaking head off.  Blood erupted from the severed stump while the head bounced on the floor and Johnny Cage merely put his sunglasses on and struck a pose.  That was my first experience with a “fatality”, which would go on to be quite the controversial subject.

Senator Joseph Lieberman

In the arcades it was all good and well, but once it hit home 16-bit consoles in 1992 suddenly governmental groups took notice, namely senators Joe Lieberman (Connecticut) and Herb Kohl (Wisconsin).  They decided that video game companies were pandering violence to children, using these video game console “toys” as the vehicle, and in December 1993 decided to take it to congress.  At that time both Nintendo and Sega had versions of Mortal Kombat on the market, but each had its own way of handling the questionable content.  Nintendo thought it was taking the moral high ground by converting the mild hints of blood to gray sweat – hardcore SNES players of the time used Game Genie to turn it back to red – and changed the fatalities to bloodless “finishing moves”.  Sega, being the more salacious of the bunch, kept all the violence and fatalities intact on its consoles and instead opted for a code to unlock it – every Sega player remembers “ABACABB” and “DULLARD” for the Genesis as well as “212DU” for Game Gear.  Sega had decided to self-police its titles and implemented a rating system on its games, mostly taking queues from the motion picture industry.  There were 3 ratings: GA (general audiences), MA-13 (parental advisory under 13), and MA-17 (parental advisory under 17).  For one reason or another Mortal Kombat received an MA-13 from Sega.  Not that any of this mattered.  To the

Senator Herb Kohl

senators changing fatalities were finishing moves didn’t change the fact that Scorpion would still char the opponent to bones and a rating, especially one that was self-established, may as well have been a promotional logo.  To further explain their opinions, the senators screened what they claimed was the Sega Genesis version of Mortal Kombat, but since anyone who played that version knows how crappy and fake it looks, they opted to show off the much more crisp and clear arcade version.  Semantics, sure, but still valid.  It’s important to note that Mortal Kombat was not alone in these hearings – Night Trap, Lethal Enforcers, and Doom shared the spotlight.

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Written by Fred Rojas

November 8, 2011 at 2:18 pm